Darlton: The Meaning of Lost

“‘The X-Files’ wasn’t about aliens invading, but about the relationship between Scully and Mulder, the balance between faith and science,” Lindelof said. “(‘Lost’) is about people who are metaphorically lost in their lives and get on an airplane and crash on an island and become physically lost on Earth. Once they are metaphysically able to find themselves in their lives again, they will physically find themselves back in the world again. When you look at the entire show, that’s what it will look like and that’s what it’s always been about.”

In the minds of those who cared more about seeing Claire and Charlie, Jin and Sun, Juliet and Sawyer and Sayid and Shannon joined in forever-after bliss courtesy of island caretaker Hurley — who ends up with his own happily-ever-after — the show ended on the perfect note. As for the mysteries, those can wait for another day.

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You’re still puzzled by what you watched on “Lost,” haunted by that final scene on “Nip/Tuck,” comforted by that cozy closer in Trafalgar Square on “Ugly Betty” and wondering what’s become of your “Heroes.”

Series finales are always tough on both the viewers and the writers. Fans want perfection, and like children hoping to offer up an A-filled report card to their parents, writers strive to deliver.

Oftentimes, disappointment results on both sides, especially when iconic series come to a close, but not always. Here’s a look at how five series ended this year, and what some show creators thought of the way things wrapped up.

‘Lost’
In the end, “Lost” producers delivered exactly what they promised.

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    1. Which was your favorite ending? It’s tough to please everyone, but writers sure tried to this year. Which show did the best job? Cast your vote.

Those dwelling too heavily in the world of polar bears and sequenced numbers felt slighted after a finale filled with emotional reunions and spiritual awakenings reaped little in the way of specific answers.

It was a brilliant move by producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse to leave the audience still questioning and pondering after the final credits rolled. One thing was certain: The two men stayed true to their word that “Lost” was a show about people. Dharma Initiative, Temple dwellers, Charles Widmore, Smoke Monster, time travel, car crashes, water references and those devilish numbers all just served as an interesting way to propel those stories along.

“ ‘The X-Files’ wasn’t about aliens invading, but about the relationship between Scully and Mulder, the balance between faith and science,” Lindelof said. “(‘Lost’) is about people who are metaphorically lost in their lives and get on an airplane and crash on an island and become physically lost on Earth. Once they are metaphysically able to find themselves in their lives again, they will physically find themselves back in the world again. When you look at the entire show, that’s what it will look like and that’s what it’s always been about.”

In the minds of those who cared more about seeing Claire and Charlie, Jin and Sun, Juliet and Sawyer and Sayid and Shannon joined in forever-after bliss courtesy of island caretaker Hurley — who ends up with his own happily-ever-after — the show ended on the perfect note. As for the mysteries, those can wait for another day.

It’s an ending that echoes the satisfaction Lindelof felt when watching his all-time favorite finale, “M*A*S*H.”

“I remember watching that with my folks and how emotional it was when Hawkeye breaks down saying, ‘It was a baby, it wasn’t a chicken’ and the chopper took off and Klinger stayed behind. That’s stuff that has stayed with me for my life,” Lindelof said. “To end a show people still care about and give the characters incredibly fulfilling resolutions, ‘M*A*S*H’ is still the pinnacle

Source: MSN

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